Name of leader         Hassan Nasrallah

Kunya                                Abu Hadi

Organization                   Hezbollah

Org. translation              Party of Allah

Org. alias                          Islamic Jihad Organization

Conflict country             Israel; Lebanon

Gender                             Male   

    

Year of birth                    August 31, 1960

Place of birth                  Bourj Hammoud, Lebanon[1]

Year of death                  N/A

 

 

Deceased

 

No, he is not dead.

 

Birth order

 

He is the oldest of 9 children.

 

Age at start of rebel leadership

 

He was 32 at the time he gained leadership.

 

Leader entry method

 

After the assassination of al-Musawi, Iran’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Khamenei, appointed Nasrallah the leader of Hezbollah.[2]

 

Powersharing

 

No, although some report that in 2007 Iran ordered Nasrallah to hand over control of Hezbollah’s military operations to Naim Qasim.[3]

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

After finishing secondary school, he went to seminary in Najaf, Iraq. [4]

 

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

Yes, he is married.[5]

 

Children

 

Yes, Nasrallah has three living children; one was killed fighting the IDF.[6]

 

Religious identification

 

He is a Shi’a Muslim.

 

Elite family background

 

No, he was not from an elite family background.[7]

 

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

 

Yes, Nasrallah was originally and briefly affiliated with Amal and Islamic Amal.[8]

 

Physical and mental health

 

No, there is no evidence of poor physical or mental health.

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

Nasrallah taught at Abbas al-Musawi’s Amal-affiliated school.[9]

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No, there is no evidence he has experience in a state military.

 

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No, there is no evidence he has experience in a nonstate military.

 

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

Yes, Nasrallah was a guerrilla commander of Hezbollah.[10]

 

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No, there is no evidence he held a government position.

 

Lived in exile?

 

No, there is no evidence he lived in exile.

 

Study abroad?

 

Yes. In 1978, Nasrallah studied at a hawza in Najaf, Iraq.[11] In 1989, Nasrallah studied at a hawza in Qom, Iran.[12]

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

No--there is no evidence he received military training abroad.

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

No, Nasrallah did, however, work as Hezbollah’s representative in Iran.[13]

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

No, there is no evidence he served time in prison.

 

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

Yes, in July 2006, “Israeli war planes destroyed Nasrallah’s home and office.” There was another rumor that there was an attempt to poison him in October 2008.[14]

 

Cause of Death?

 

N/A

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

He speaks Levantine Arabic and Classical Arabic.[15]

 

 

Image Credit: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2c/Sayyid_Nasrallah.jpg/440px-Sayyid_Nasrallah.jpg

[1] Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah.

[2] “Profile: Sayed Hassan Nasrallah,” Al-Jazeera, April 10, 2006, www.aljazeera.com/archive/2006/04/2008410115816863222.html.

[3] Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah.

[4] Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah.

[5] “Profile: Sayed Hassan Nasrallah,” Al-Jazeera, April 10, 2006, www.aljazeera.com/archive/2006/04/2008410115816863222.html.

[6] Neil MacFarquhar, “Arab World Finds Icon in Leader of Hezbollah,” New York Times, August 7, 2006, nytimes.com/2006/08/07/world/middleeast/07nasrallah.html.

[7] Neil MacFarquhar, “Arab World Finds Icon in Leader of Hezbollah,” New York Times, August 7, 2006, nytimes.com/2006/08/07/world/middleeast/07nasrallah.html.

[8] “Profile: Sayed Hassan Nasrallah,” Al-Jazeera, April 10, 2006, www.aljazeera.com/archive/2006/04/2008410115816863222.html.

[9] “Profile: Sayed Hassan Nasrallah,” Al-Jazeera, April 10, 2006, www.aljazeera.com/archive/2006/04/2008410115816863222.html.

[10]Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah..

[11] Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah.

[12] Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah.

[13] Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah.

[14] Eben Kaplan, “Profile: Hassan Nasrallah,” Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2010, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/profile-hassan-nasrallah. “Hassan Nasrallah Survives Assassination Attempt,” Jerusalem Post, October 22, 2008, fr.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1222017595194&pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull.

[15] Neil MacFarquhar, “Arab World Finds Icon in Leader of Hezbollah,” New York Times, August 7, 2006, www.nytimes.com/2006/08/07/world/middleeast/07nasrallah.html.

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