Name of leader          Bagauddin Magomedov

 

Alias                                    Muhammed Bahauddin Kebedov                          

 

Organization                    Wahhabi-Muslim rebel organization

Conflict country              Russia

Gender                               Male   

    

Year of birth                      1945[1]

 

Place of birth                   Pervomayskoe, Russia[2]

 

Year of death                    N/A

 

 

Deceased

 

No; there is no evidence he has died.

 

Birth order

 

His birth order is unknown.

 

Age at start of rebel leadership

 

In 1990--circa around the age of 45.[3]

 

Leader entry method

 

His entry method is unclear[4][5]

 

Powersharing

 

No; there is no evidence of powersharing.

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

“Bagauddin, who had received traditional education from local Dagestani [Islamic] scholars (ulama), got acquainted with Salafism mainly through literature and also through rare contacts with Arab students studying in the USSR. He became a follower of the strict version of Salafism, emphasizing the provocative and conflicting aspects of the doctrine – takfir (the accusation of infidels) and widely using this doctrine against those Muslims who did not fit the strict Salafi criteria of ‘true belief.’ ”[6] 

 

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

Whether he is married is unknown.

 

Children

 

Whether he has children is unknown.

 

Religious identification

 

He practices Wahhabi- (Sunni-) Islam.[7]

 

Elite family background

 

No; Bagauddin Kebedov’s parents had moved from their native Dagestani village of Sasitli to Vedeno in Chechnya following the deportation of the Chechens in 1944, and in 1957 resettled in the village of Pervomayskoe in Dagestan.[8]

 

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

 

No; there is no evidence of political affiliations.

 

Physical and mental health

 

No; there is no evidence of poor physical or mental health.

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

He was a teacher.[9]

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No; there is no evidence of experience in a state military.

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

No; there is no evidence of experience in a nonstate military.

 

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

No; there is no evidence of combat experience.

 

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No; he did not hold a governmental position.

 

Lived in exile?

 

No; there is no evidence he lived in exile.

 

Study abroad?

 

No; there is no evidence of study abroad.

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

No; there is no evidence of military training abroad.

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

No; there is no evidence of extensive work experience abroad.

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

No; there is no evidence he served time in prison.

 

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

No; there is no evidence of an assassination attempt by the state.

 

Cause of Death?

 

N/A

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

He speaks Avar primarily and Arabic as well.

 

 

[1] Vladmir Bobrovnikov, “Post-Socialist Forms Islam Caucasian Wahhabis,” July 2001, Accessed June 2, 2017, https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/17479/ISIM_7_Post-Socialist_Forms_of_Islam_Caucasian_Wahhabis.pdf?sequence=1.

[2] Vladmir Bobrovnikov, “Post-Socialist Forms Islam Caucasian Wahhabis,” July 2001, Accessed June 2, 2017, https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/17479/ISIM_7_Post-Socialist_Forms_of_Islam_Caucasian_Wahhabis.pdf?sequence=1.

[3] Dr. Robert Bruce Ware, Dr. Enver Kisriev, Prof. Dr. Werner J. Patzelt, Ms. Ute Roericht, “Political Islam in Dagestan,” Accessed June 5, 2017, http://www.siue.edu/~rware/Political_Islam_in_Dagestan.pdf.

[4] Dr. Robert Bruce Ware, Dr. Enver Kisriev, Prof. Dr. Werner J. Patzelt, Ms. Ute Roericht, “Political Islam in Dagestan,” Accessed June 5, 2017, http://www.siue.edu/~rware/Political_Islam_in_Dagestan.pdf.

[5] Kimitaka Matsuzato, Emerging meso-areas in the former socialist countries: histories revised or improvised? ( Sapporo: Hokkaido University, 2005), 198.

[6] Kimitaka Matsuzato, Emerging meso-areas in the former socialist countries: histories revised or improvised? ( Sapporo: Hokkaido University, 2005), 197.

[7] Mikhail Iu. Roshchin, “Dagestan and the War Next Door,” Institute for the Study of Conflict, Ideology, and Policy, no. 1 (2000), accessed January 16, 2016, http://www.bu.edu/iscip/vol11/Roshchin.html.

[8] Vladmir Bobrovnikov, “Post-Socialist Forms Islam Caucasian Wahhabis,” July 2001, Accessed June 2, 2017, https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/17479/ISIM_7_Post-Socialist_Forms_of_Islam_Caucasian_Wahhabis.pdf?sequence=1.

[9] Vladmir Bobrovnikov, “Post-Socialist Forms Islam Caucasian Wahhabis,” July 2001, Accessed June 2, 2017, https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/17479/ISIM_7_Post-Socialist_Forms_of_Islam_Caucasian_Wahhabis.pdf?sequence=1.