Name of leader         Abulfaz Eltjibey

 

Alt. Spelling                     Abulfaz Elchibey[1]

 

Alias                                   Abulfaz Qedirqulu Aliyev[2])

 

Organization                   APF (Azerbaijan Popular Front (APF) [3] 

 

Alt. Name                         Azeri Popular Front[4])

 

Conflict country             Russia/Azerbaijan       

 

Gender                             Male   

    

Year of birth                    June 7, 1938[5], [6]

 

Place of birth                 Keleki, Soviet Union (Now Azerbaijan)[7]

 

Year of death                 2000[8]

 

Deceased

 

Yes; he died in 2000 of prostate cancer.

Birth order

His birth order is unknown.

Age at start of rebel leadership

He began his leadership at age 51.

 

Leader entry method

 

He was a cofounder.[9] He was elected chairman.[10] “The APF's founding congress in July 1989 elected Abdulfaz Elchibey party chairman.”[11] 

 

Powersharing

 

No; there is no evidence of powersharing.[12]

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

He received his doctorate from Tulunid University in Egypt. He studied Oriental Studies and Poetry at Azerbaijan State University. “He went to Baku as a 19-year-old student and studied Arabic at the state university.”[13] “Driven by his desire to study traditional Azeri poets who had written in the Persian and Arabic languages, in 1957, Elchibey began his education at the Oriental Studies Department at Azerbaijan State University (currently Baku State University).” He studied Arabic. [14] He “studied Arabic at the state university.”[15]

“In 1969, Elchibey completed his doctoral thesis on the Tulunid state (a Turkic state in Egypt in a ninth and tenth century).” [16] 

 

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

Yes; he was married, but the time is unknown.[17]

 

Children

 

Yes; he had two children.[18] [19]

Religious identification

 

He identified as Muslim.

 

Family background

 

His family background is unknown, but his father died in the First World War. [20]

 

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

 

From 1969 to 1974 he was involved in anti-Soviet activities which got him arrested for 18 months, after that he was “one of the instigators and leaders of the demonstrations that began regularly to take place in the centre of Baku”.[21]

 

Physical and mental health

 

Yes; in 2000, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2000 and died later that year.[22]

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

He was a history professor as his dominant occupation. He also worked as a “Russian-Arabic translator in Egypt in 1963-1964.” [23] He had “previously worked as an Arab philologist and a history professor, published more than 50 books on such subjects as philosophy, history, and religion.”[24]

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No; there is no evidence of experience in a state military.

 

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No; there is no evidence of experience in a nonstate military.

 

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

No; there is no evidence of combat experience.

 

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No; there is no evidence of him holding a government position prior to assuming leadership.

 

Lived in exile?

 

While president of Azerbaijan, Armenian forces took over leaving Azerbaijan in a weak position when “Surat Huseinov, a millionaire businessman from Azerbaijan's second city of Gyandzha, marched on the capital”, ultimately forcing Elchibey to flee to Nakichevan until 1997.[25] However, technically no, as Nakichevan is still part of Azerbaijan and it was after being ousted from President. He spent four years “in internal exile in Nakhichevan” after being “driven from office in June 1993.”[26]

 

Study abroad?

 

Yes; “in 1969, Elchibey completed his doctoral thesis on the Tulunid state (a Turkic state in Egypt in a ninth and tenth century).” [27]

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence of him receiving military training abroad.

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

Yes, he worked as a “Russian-Arabic translator in Egypt in 1963-1964” [28]

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

Yes, he was arrested in the 1970s for 18 months for anti-Soviet activities.[29]

He was “imprisoned in the 1970s on charges of pan-Turkism and Azeri nationalism” [30] He was imprisoned from January 1975 to July 1976. [31]

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

No; there is no evidence of an assassination attempt by the state.

 

Cause of Death?

 

He “died of prostate cancer in Ankara at the age of 62.”[32]

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

He spoke Azerbaijani as his primary, as well as Russian. He knew at least one form of Arabic[33], as he worked as a Russian-Arabic translator.[34]

 

 

Image Credit: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/91/Əbülfəz_Elçibəy_portret.jpg/876px-Əbülfəz_Elçibəy_portret.jpg

[1] “Abulfaz Elchibey: President of Azerbaijan,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Abulfez-Elchibey

[2] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[3] “Abulfaz Elchibey: President of Azerbaijan,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Abulfez-Elchibey

[4] “Azerbaijan Human Rights Practices, 1992:” Department of State Dispatch, March 1993, Accessed February 4, 2019, through Lexus Nexis.

[5] The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, "Abulfaz Elchibey: President of Azerbaijan," Encyclopedia Britannica, December 31, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Abulfez-Elchibey.

[6] Jonathan Steele, “Abulfaz Elchibey: Azerbaijani Independence Leader Undermined by Clan Rivalries and Ethnic Strife,” The Guardian, August 25, 2000, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/aug/26/guardianobituaries.jonathansteele

[7]  The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, "Abulfaz Elchibey: President of Azerbaijan," Encyclopedia Britannica, December 31, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Abulfez-Elchibey.

[8]  The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, "Abulfaz Elchibey: President of Azerbaijan," Encyclopedia Britannica, December 31, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Abulfez-Elchibey.

[9] “Abulfaz Elchibey: President of Azerbaijan,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Abulfez-Elchibey

[10] Suha Bolukbasi, Azerbaijan: A Political History, I.B. Tauris and Co. Ltd, (NY, NY 2011): 108.

[11] "Azerbaijan - The Appearance of Opposition Parties," Azerbaijan - The Appearance of Opposition Parties, Accessed December 19, 2016, http://countrystudies.us/azerbaijan/28.htm.

[12] Jonathan Steele, "Abulfaz Elchibey," The Guardian. August 25, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/aug/26/guardianobituaries.jonathansteele.

[13]  Jonathan Steele, "Abulfaz Elchibey," The Guardian. August 25, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/aug/26/guardianobituaries.jonathansteele.

[14] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[15] Douglas Frantz, “Abulfaz Elchibey, Who Led Free Azerbaijan, Dies at 62,” The New York Times, August 23, 2000, accessed April 1, 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2000/08/23/world/abulfaz-elchibey-who-led-free-azerbaijan-dies-at-62.html

[16] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[17] "Abulfaz Elchibey," The Telegraph, August 23, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1367190/Abulfaz-Elchibey.html.

[18]  "Abulfaz Elchibey," The Telegraph, August 23, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1367190/Abulfaz-Elchibey.html.

[19] Jonathan Steele, “Abulfaz Elchibey: Azerbaijani Independence Leader Undermined by Clan Rivalries and Ethnic Strife,” The Guardian, August 25, 2000, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/aug/26/guardianobituaries.jonathansteele

[20] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[21] "Abulfaz Elchibey," The Telegraph, August 23, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1367190/Abulfaz-Elchibey.html.

[22] Douglas Frantz, "Abulfaz Elchibey, Who Led Free Azerbaijan, Dies at 62," The New York Times, August 23, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/2000/08/23/world/abulfaz-elchibey-who-led-free-azerbaijan-dies-at-62.html.

[23] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[24] “Abulfaz Elchibey: President of Azerbaijan,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Abulfez-Elchibey

[25] Jonathan Steele, “Abulfaz Elchibey: Azerbaijani Independence Leader Undermined by Clan Rivalries and Ethnic Strife,” The Guardian, August 25, 2000, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/aug/26/guardianobituaries.jonathansteele

[26] Douglas Frantz, “Abulfaz Elchibey, Who Led Free Azerbaijan, Dies at 62,” The New York Times, August 23, 2000, accessed April 1, 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2000/08/23/world/abulfaz-elchibey-who-led-free-azerbaijan-dies-at-62.html

[27] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[28] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[29] "Abulfaz Elchibey," The Telegraph, August 23, 2000, Accessed December 19, 2016, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1367190/Abulfaz-Elchibey.html.

[30] Suha Bolukbasi, Azerbaijan: A Political History, I.B. Tauris and Co. Ltd, (NY, NY 2011): 108.

[31] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

[32] Jonathan Steele, “Abulfaz Elchibey: Azerbaijani Independence Leader Undermined by Clan Rivalries and Ethnic Strife,” The Guardian, August 25, 2000, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/aug/26/guardianobituaries.jonathansteele

[33] Jonathan Steele, “Abulfaz Elchibey: Azerbaijani Independence Leader Undermined by Clan Rivalries and Ethnic Strife,” The Guardian, August 25, 2000, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/aug/26/guardianobituaries.jonathansteele

[34] “Nationalism, Elchibey and the Birth of the Popular Front,” European Stability Initiative, Accessed February 4, 2019, https://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=321&country_ID=2&slide_ID=5

Eltjibey.png