Name of leader          Ahmad Jibril

Kunya                                al-Khalifa (the Caliph)

 

Organization                   al-Jabha al-Sha’biyye li-Tahrir Filastin-al-Qaedat al-‘Aama

Org. translation.             Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - General Command (PFLP-GC)

Conflict country             Israel; Syria; Lebanon

 

Gender                             Male   

    

Year of birth                    1938 [1]

 

Place of birth                  Yazur, British Mandatory Palestine[2]

 

Year of death                  2021

 

 

Deceased

 

Yes; he died on 7 July 2021.

Birth order

 

His birth order is unknown.

 

Age at start of rebel leadership

 

He began his leadership role at age 30.[3]

 

Leader entry method

 

He founded the PFLP-GC.[4]

 

Powersharing

 

No; there is no evidence of powersharing.

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

“After obtaining a high school diploma in scientific specialization in Damascus in 1956, he moved to Cairo and joined the military college and graduated in 1959, so Ahmed Jibril is considered one of the few Palestinian leaders who received an academic military formation…. During his studies in Egypt cofounded the General Union of Palestinian Students, where the idea of ​​armed struggle for the liberation of Palestine began to crystallize.”[5]

           

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

Yes; he was married but at what age is unknown.

 

Children

 

Yes; he had one son.[6]

 

Religious identification

 

He practiced Islam.

 

Elite family background

 

No, there is no evidence that he is from an elite family background.

 

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

 

Yes; he helped found the Palestine Liberation Front and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine prior to creating the PFLP-GC.[7]

 

Physical and mental health

 

Yes; Jibril’s health problems have contributed to the PFLP-GC’s decline.[8]

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

He had a military career.

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

Yes; in 1956, Jibril joined the Syrian army. He reached the rank of captain in the engineering brigade. He became a demolition expert. In 1958, he was dishonorably discharged for holding radical political views.[9]

 

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

Yes; he had experience in a nonstate military.

 

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

Whether he had combat experience is unknown.

 

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No; there is no evidence that he held a government position.

 

Lived in exile?

 

Yes; his family moved to Syria.[10] He was described as an exiled leader in Damascus.[11]

 

Study abroad?

 

Yes; he was trained in demolition in Syrian army.[12] He also studied in Egypt as noted in the education section.

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

Yes; he was trained in Syrian army.[13]

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

Yes; as he was in the Syrian army.

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

Yes; Egypt briefly imprisoned Jibril for holding anti-Nasserist views.[14]

 

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

Yes; there was an attempt in 1988.[15]

 

Cause of Death?

 

He died of heart failure.

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

His primary language was Arabic.

 

 

 

[1]Image Credit: http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/735000/images/_736490_jibril150.jpg

(For non-commercial use, all credits belong to the original owners, please contact for removal)

 “Ahmed Jibril and the PFlP-GC,” BBC (20 May 2002): accessible at news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1998598.stm.

[2] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.

[3] “Ahmed Jibril and the PFlP-GC,” BBC (20 May 2002): accessible at news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1998598.stm.

[4] “Ahmed Jibril and the PFlP-GC,” BBC (20 May 2002): accessible at news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1998598.stm.

[5] “Ahmed Jibril,” Aljazeera

[6] “Ahmed Jibril and the PFlP-GC,” BBC (20 May 2002): accessible at news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1998598.stm.

[7] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.

[8] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.

[9] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.

[10] “Ahmed Jibril and the PFlP-GC,” BBC (20 May 2002): accessible at news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1998598.stm.

[11] Anwar Ambo, “Israel, Lebanon: Tehran Reins in Hezbollah,” Stratfor, January 6, 2009, https://worldview.stratfor.com/article/israel-lebanon-tehran-reins-hezbollah

[12] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.

[13] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.

[14] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.

[15] Stephen E. Atkins, Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004), 160-161.