Name of leader         Abdul Rashid Dostum

 

Organization                   Junbish-I Milli-yi Islami

English Translation       National Islamic Movement

 

Conflict country             Afghanistan

 

Gender                             Male   

    

Year of birth                    1954[1]

 

Place of birth                 Khojah Dukoh in Afghanistan[2]

 

Year of death                 N/A

 

 

Deceased

 

No,  there is no evidence that he has died.

 

Birth order

 

His birth order is unknown, but he had nine siblings.[3]

 

Age at start of rebel leadership

 

He became leader in 1991, so at the age of 37.[4]

 

Leader entry method:

 

He founded the National Islamic Movement of Afghanistan.[5]

 

Powersharing

 

No, there is no evidence of powersharing.

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

He went to the Soviet Union for military studies.[6] He is a graduate of the Soviet Military Academy.[7] There is no evidence of education in the West.

 

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

Yes, at what age is unknown, but they likely got married in the 1980s.[8]

 

Children

 

Yes, he has children.[9]

 

Religious identification

 

He is Muslim. [10]

 

Elite family background

 

No, there is no evidence that he is from an elite family background.[11]

 

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

 

No, there is no evidence of political affiliations.

 

Physical and mental health

 

No, there is no evidence of poor physical or mental health.

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

He worked in labor, as he was a Communist union boss who worked on a gas field.[12]

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

Yes, in 1978 he fought with the Afghan military versus the mujahideen.[13]

 

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

Yes, in 1978 and then in the 1980s he switched sides and fought with the mujahideen against the Afghan Soviet backed military.[14]

 

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

Yes, as noted above.[15]

 

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No, there is no evidence that he held a government position.

 

Lived in exile?

 

Yes, in 1997 he was forced into exile in Uzbekistan after the Taliban capture of his base.[16] Then in 2008 he was forced into exile in Turkey.[17]

 

Study abroad?

 

Yes, he studied abroad in the Soviet Union[18]

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

Yes, he received training from the Soviets.[19]

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence that he has extensive work experience abroad.

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

No, there is no evidence that he served time in prison.

 

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

No, there is no evidence of an assassination attempt.

 

Cause of Death?

 

N/A

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

He likely spoke Dari and also some Arabic. There is no evidence of English speaking.

 

 

[1]Image Credit: Wikimedia. "File:Abdul Rashid Dostum in September 2014.jpg." Wikimedia Commons. Accessed September 15, 2021. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Abdul_Rashid_Dostum_in_September_2014.jpg.

 "Dostum, Abdul Rashid," Afghan Biographies, October 13, 2009, Accessed February 19, 2017, http://www.afghan-bios.info/index.php?option=com_afghanbios&id=439&task=view&total=15&start=2&Itemid=2.

[2] Ibid.

[3] Brian Glyn Williams, The Last Warlord (Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2013), 80.

[4] See f.n.1

[5] Ibid.

[6] "Big fish among the Afghan warlords," The Washington Times, October 12, 2008, Accessed February 21, 2017, http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/oct/12/big-fish-among-the-Afghan-warlords/.

[7] Frud Bezhan, “Afghanistan's Dostum Turns To Old Ally Russia For Help,” October 7, 2015, Accessed June 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/afghanistan-russia-dostum-seeks-military-help/27293696.html.

[8] Brian Glyn Williams, The Last Warlord (Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2013), 298.

[9] Ibid.

[10] See f.n.1

[11] "Profile: General Rashid Dostum," BBC New, September 25, 2001, Accessed February 19, 2017, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/1563344.stm.

[12] Ibid.

[13] Ibid.

[14] See f.n.1

[15] Ibid.

[16] "Abdul Rashid Dostum," GlobalSecurity.org, Accessed February 19, 2017, http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/afghanistan/dostum.htm.

[17] See f.n.1

[18] See f.n.6

[19] Ibid.