Name of leader          Puspa Kamal Dahal

 

Nom de Guerre               Prachanda (means "fierce")

Organization                    Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist (CPN-M))

Conflict country              Nepal

 

Gender                              Male   

    

Year of birth                     1954 [1]

 

Place of birth                   Lewadi, Nepal[2]

 

Year of death                   N/A

 

 

Deceased

 

N/A

 

Birth order

 

He is the eldest son.[3]

 

Age at start of rebel leadership

 

In 1989, he became the general secretary of the CPN. Therefore, he was 35 years old.[4]

 

Leader entry method

 

He was appointed to be the top leader of the communist group Mashal by Mohan Baidya, the previous leader, when the latter stepped down in October 1989.[5] He remained in leadership position thereafter, even as Mashal eventually became the CPN-M and led a violent rebellion starting in 1996.

 

Powersharing

 

No, there is no evidence of powersharing. [6]

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

He finished his bachelor’s degree. In 1975, he graduated from the Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science in Rampur, Chitwan district.[7]

 

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

Yes,[8] he married Sita Poudel at age 15.[9]

 

Children

 

He has four children: three daughters and a son.[10]

 

Religious identification

 

He is Hindu.[11]

 

Elite family background

 

He is from a poor farming family.[12]

 

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

 

Yes, in 1980, Prachanda was tasked with leading the All Nepal National Free Students’ Union (Revolutionary), which was affiliated with the radical Communist Party of Nepal (Masal), or CPN (Masal) (Masal means “flame” in Nepalese).[13]

 

Physical and mental health

 

No, there is no evidence of poor physical or mental health.

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

He was a school teacher.[14]

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No, there is no evidence of experience in a state military.

 

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No, there is no evidence of experience in a nonstate military.

 

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

No, there is no evidence of combat experience.

 

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No, there is no evidence he held a government position.

 

Lived in exile?

 

No, there is no evidence he lived in exile.

 

Study abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence he studied abroad.

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence of military training abroad.

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence he had extensive work experience abroad.

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

No, there is no evidence he served time in prison.

 

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

No, there is no evidence of an assassination attempt by the state.

 

Cause of Death?

 

N/A

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

His primary language is Nepali, and he also speaks English.

 

 

 

[1]Image Credit: CROPPED: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2_NCP%27s_Chairman-KP_Sharma_Oli_and_Puspa_Kamal_Dahal%27Prachanda%27.jpg

 The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, “Prachanda Prime Minister of Nepal,” Encyclopedia Britannica, August 22, 2016, accessed December 9, 2017, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Prachanda.

[2] The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, “Prachanda Prime Minister of Nepal,” Encyclopedia Britannica, August 22, 2016, accessed December 9, 2017, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Prachanda.

[3] Pratyoush Onta and Seira Tamang, “xxxx,” in Pathways to Power: The Domestic Politics of South Asia, edited by Arjun Guneratne and Anita M. Weiss, (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), 306.

[4] Pratyoush Onta and Seira Tamang, “xxxx,” in Pathways to Power: The Domestic Politics of South Asia, edited by Arjun Guneratne and Anita M. Weiss, (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), 306.

[5]  Aditya Adhikari, The Bullet and the Ballot Box: The Story of Nepal’s Maoist Revolution, (London: Verso, 2014), 7-8.

[6] Aditya Adhikari, The Bullet and the Ballot Box: The Story of Nepal’s Maoist Revolution, (London: Verso, 2014), 7-8.

[7]Aditya Adhikari, The Bullet and the Ballot Box: The Story of Nepal’s Maoist Revolution, (London: Verso, 2014), 7-8.

[8] “Profile: Nepal Maoist leader Prachanda,” BBC, November 21, 2013, accessed December 9, 2017, http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-25032962.

[9] Pratyoush Onta and Seira Tamang, “xxxx,” in Pathways to Power: The Domestic Politics of South Asia, edited by Arjun Guneratne and Anita M. Weiss, (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), 306.

[10] “Profile: Prachanda, from commander to prime minister,” xinhuanet, August 15, 2008, Accessed December 21, 2017, https://web.archive.org/web/20160306182645/http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-08/15/content_9366494.htm; Pratyoush Onta and Seira Tamang, “xxxx,” in Pathways to Power: The Domestic Politics of South Asia, edited by Arjun Guneratne and Anita M. Weiss, (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), 306.

[11] “RELIGIONS,” CIA, Accessed January 2, 2018, https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2122.html.

[12] Adhikari 2014, 5-8.

[13] Adhikari 2014, 5-8.

[14] Adhikari 2014, 5.