Name of leader          Abdul Malik Drukdal

 

Alt. spelling                      Abdelmalek Droukdel

 

Kunya                                Abu Musab Abdel Wadoud

Organization                   Tanzim al-Qaeda fi Bilad al-Maghreb al-Islami

 

Org. translation              al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM)

Previous org. name       Groupe Salafiste pour la Prédication et le Combat (GSPC)

Org. translation              Salafi Group for Preaching and Fighting 

 

Conflict country              Algeria; Mali

Gender                              Male   

    

Year of birth                     1970

 

Place of birth                   Mefta, Blidad, Algeria  

Year of death                   N/A

 

 

Deceased

 

No, there is no evidence that he died.

 

Birth order

 

His birth order is unknown.

 

Age at start of rebel leadership

 

He became leader in 2004, so at the age of 34.[1]

 

Leader entry method

 

“He later took over as the emir of GSPC in 2004 following the death of his predecessor, Nabil Sahraoui, a position that he continues to hold.”[2]

 

Powersharing

 

No, there is no evidence of powersharing.

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

He went to Madjine Ibrahim primary school.[3] “The first operations of Islamist groups in the late 1980s, fascinated the young man, who regularly attended the mosque. When he graduated as Bachelor in Mathematics at the University of Blida, he established his first contacts with the Islamic fighters salvation front (FIS). It is one of his contacts there who recommended him that he should begin studying chemistry. Droukdel graduated in 1994. A year earlier, he had joined the armed struggle joining the Armed Islamic Group (GIA). His academic background makes him a bomb maker.”[4] There is no evidence that Drukdal was educated in the West.       

 

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

No, there is no evidence he has been married.

 

Children

 

No, there is no evidence he has children.

 

Religious identification

 

He practices Islam.[5]

 

Elite family background

 

No, he “grew up in a modest family that was strongly influenced by religion.”[6]

 

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

 

No, his political affiliations were closely related to his rebel leader position.

 

Physical and mental health

 

There is no evidence of poor physical or mental health.

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

He should be considered an activist, as he did nothing else professionally between his education and joining the armed struggle. He was a chemist according to an article, but it appears that he did not actually practice chemistry, just studied it.[7]

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No, there is no evidence of state military experience.

 

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

Yes. In 1993, “he joined the ranks of the armed struggle within the Armed Islamic Group. His university education makes him an artificer. He experiments, climbs the ladder and gets noticed, notably by Hassan Hattab.”[8]

 

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

Yes, he had combat experience fighting with the GIA as noted above.

 

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No, there is no evidence he held a government position.

 

Lived in exile?

 

No, there is no evidence he lived in exile.

 

Study abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence of study abroad.

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence of military training abroad.

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

No, there is no evidence he had extensive work experience abroad

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

No, there is no evidence he served time in prison.

 

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

No, there is no evidence of an assassination attempt by the state.

 

Cause of Death?

 

N/A

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

He spoke Maghrebi Arabic.

 

 

 

[1]Image Credit: https://www.middleeasteye.net/sites/default/files/styles/wysiwyg_large/public/images/DJ_ty8FW0AAzg8D.jpg?itok=Wy-m2kcE

(For non-commercial use, all credits belong to the original owners, please contact for removal)

 Ibid.

[2] “Northern Africa’s Most Wanted,” Counter Terror Business, Accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.counterterrorbusiness.com/node/12624.

[3] “Northern Africa’s Most Wanted,” Counter Terror Business, Accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.counterterrorbusiness.com/node/12624.

[4] “Mali: Abdelmalek Droukdel, leader of AQIM,” WorldWideConflicts, January 29, 2013, Accessed April 16, 2018, https://worldwideconflicts.wordpress.com/2013/01/29/mali-abdelmalek-droukdel-leader-of-aqim/.

[5] Vincent Duhem, “Nord-Mali – Aqmi: Abdelmalek Droukdel appelle à imposer «graduellement» la charia,” Jeune Afrique, May 24, 2012, Accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.jeuneafrique.com/175961/politique/nord-mali-aqmi-abdelmalek-droukdel-appelle-imposer-graduellement-la-charia/.

[6] Vincent Duhem, “Nord-Mali – Aqmi: Abdelmalek Droukdel appelle à imposer «graduellement» la charia,” Jeune Afrique, May 24, 2012, Accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.jeuneafrique.com/175961/politique/nord-mali-aqmi-abdelmalek-droukdel-appelle-imposer-graduellement-la-charia/.

[7] Vincent Duhem, “Nord-Mali – Aqmi: Abdelmalek Droukdel appelle à imposer «graduellement» la charia,” Jeune Afrique, May 24, 2012, Accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.jeuneafrique.com/175961/politique/nord-mali-aqmi-abdelmalek-droukdel-appelle-imposer-graduellement-la-charia/.

[8] https://www.middleeasteye.net/sites/default/files/styles/wysiwyg_large/public/images/DJ_ty8FW0AAzg8D.jpg?itok=Wy-m2kcE

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