Name of leader         Wirat Angkhathawon, also known as Chen Yuan – other names include Comrade Than, Jang Yuan, and Tho Phianwitthaya.[1]

 

Organization                     The Communist Party of Thailand (CPT)

Conflict country               Thailand

 

Gender                               Male  

    

Year of birth                      1921[2]

 

Place of birth                    Bangkok, Siam (Thailand)

 

Year of death                    1997[3]

 

 

Deceased

 

Yes, he died in 1997 of natural causes.

 

Birth order

 

His birth order is unknown.

 

Age at start of rebel leadership

 

In 1961, Angkhathawon was elected to the five-member secretariat of the CPT, which is the highest position that he ever assumed within the party. He was 40 years old when he assumed his highest position.[5]

Leader entry method

 

He was elected to serve in his position.

Powersharing

 

Yes, he was elected first in 1952 to serve as a Politburo member and in 1961 to serve in the five-member secretariat of the CPT. Despite being an influential leader in the party, he never assumed the post of Secretary General of the CPT, which is the highest position in the party.[6]

 

Education (also name universities attended, if any); note any relevant experiences while a student

 

“He first studied at the Marxist-Leninist Instiute in Beijing and returned to Thailand in 1957-8 and regularly went to China for Communist Party meetings.” It is unclear if he finished his studied there.

 

Ever married? If yes, age of first marriage

 

Yes, he met his wife, Somphon, in south Thailand.[8]

 

Children

 

Whether he had children is unknown.

 

Religious identification

 

His religious identification is unknown.

 

Elite Family background

 

No, he was born to a Chinese-Teochew family.[9] It is likely that he was not belong to an elite or political family.

Political affiliations and intellectual circles; note any relevant social connections made

Yes, in 1940 he started his communist activities and was sent to Southern Thailand. Eventually, in 1943 he joined the Communist Party.[10]

Physical and mental health

 

There is a report that in 1983, he was sent to China to treat some sort of physical illness.[11] No further details on the illness available. “In late 1982 Wirat suffered a stroke. After hospitalization, he returned to China in 1983 for treatment before his death on June 16, 1997.[12]

 

Pre-militant leader occupation

 

He worked in the match factory in 1940 after school and joining the communists.[13] He served as a member of the CPT since 1943.[14]

 

Experience in a state military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No, there is no evidence of experience in a state military.

Experience in a nonstate military, and role; any relevant social ties

 

No, there is no evidence of experience in a nonstate military.

Combat experience prior to assuming resistance organization leadership?

 

No, there is no evidence of combat experience.

Held government position prior to assuming leadership?

 

No, there is no evidence he held a government position.

Lived in exile?

 

Yes, it is possible that he lived in self-imposed exile in China after he was sent to China in 1983 to treat his illness and never returned to Thailand.[15]

 

Study abroad?

 

Yes,  “he first studied at the Marxist-Leninist Instiute in Beijing and returned to Thailand in 1957-8 and regularly went to China for Communist Party meetings.”[16]

 

Did the leader receive military training abroad?

 

Yes, there is a report that since 1965, he visited the training base in Laos frequently, possibly to receive military training.[17]

 

Did the leader have extensive work experience abroad?

 

Yes, in the 1950s, he frequently visited China, possibly to maintain network of communications between the Communist Party of China and the CPT.[18]

 

Serve time in prison? Social connections during that time?

 

No, there is no evidence he served time in prison.

 

Was there an assassination attempt on the leader by the state?

 

Whether there was an assassination attempt is unknown.

Cause of Death?

 

“In late 1982 Wirat suffered a stroke. After hospitalization, he returned to China in 1983 for treatment before his death on June 16, 1997.[19]

 

Primary language, and other languages spoken as adult

 

Chinese (Teochew dialect) was his primary language because of his heritage and Thai. He spoke Thai with a Chinese accent.[21]

 

 

[1] “Two Generations of Activists: Wirat Angkhathawon and Seksan Prasertkul,” LINKS International Journal of Socialist Renewal, http://links.org.au/node/1247 - original article appears as “Wirat Angkhathawon (1921-1997),” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest. Immanuel Ness (ed.). Blackwell Publishing, 2009, Blackwell Reference alone. A corrected version also appeared at http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article14956.

[2] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[3] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[4] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[5] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[6] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[7] “Two Generations of Activists: Wirat Angkhathawon and Seksan Prasertkul,” LINKS International Journal of Socialist Renewal, http://links.org.au/node/1247 - original article appears as “Wirat Angkhathawon (1921-1997),” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest. Immanuel Ness (ed.). Blackwell Publishing, 2009, Blackwell Reference alone. A corrected version also appeared at http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article14956.

[8] “Two Generations of Activists: Wirat Angkhathawon and Seksan Prasertkul,” LINKS International Journal of Socialist Renewal, http://links.org.au/node/1247 - original article appears as “Wirat Angkhathawon (1921-1997),” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest. Immanuel Ness (ed.). Blackwell Publishing, 2009, Blackwell Reference alone. A corrected version also appeared at http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article14956.

[9] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[10] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[11] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[12] “Two Generations of Activists: Wirat Angkhathawon and Seksan Prasertkul,” LINKS International Journal of Socialist Renewal, http://links.org.au/node/1247 - original article appears as “Wirat Angkhathawon (1921-1997),” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest. Immanuel Ness (ed.). Blackwell Publishing, 2009, Blackwell Reference alone. A corrected version also appeared at http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article14956.

[13] “Two Generations of Activists: Wirat Angkhathawon and Seksan Prasertkul,” LINKS International Journal of Socialist Renewal, http://links.org.au/node/1247 - original article appears as “Wirat Angkhathawon (1921-1997),” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest. Immanuel Ness (ed.). Blackwell Publishing, 2009, Blackwell Reference alone. A corrected version also appeared at http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article14956.

[14] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[15] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[16] “Two Generations of Activists: Wirat Angkhathawon and Seksan Prasertkul,” LINKS International Journal of Socialist Renewal, http://links.org.au/node/1247 - original article appears as “Wirat Angkhathawon (1921-1997),” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest. Immanuel Ness (ed.). Blackwell Publishing, 2009, Blackwell Reference alone. A corrected version also appeared at http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article14956.

[17] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[18] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[19] “Two Generations of Activists: Wirat Angkhathawon and Seksan Prasertkul,” LINKS International Journal of Socialist Renewal, http://links.org.au/node/1247 - original article appears as “Wirat Angkhathawon (1921-1997),” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest. Immanuel Ness (ed.). Blackwell Publishing, 2009, Blackwell Reference alone. A corrected version also appeared at http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article14956.

[20] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.

[21] Chee-Beng Tan, Routledge Handbook of the Chinese Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2013), 338.